The coronavirus spread so easily between people

Naming the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and the virus that causes it
Official names have been announced for the virus responsible for COVID-19 (previously known as “2019 novel coronavirus”) and the disease it causes. The official names are:

Disease

coronavirus disease
(COVID-19)

Virus

severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2
(SARS-CoV-2)

Why do the virus and the disease have different names?
Viruses, and the diseases they cause, often have different names. For example, HIV is the virus that causes AIDS. People often know the name of a disease, such as measles, but not the name of the virus that causes it (rubeola).

There are different processes, and purposes, for naming viruses and diseases.

Viruses are named based on their genetic structure to facilitate the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines and medicines. Virologists and the wider scientific community do this work, so viruses are named by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV).

Diseases are named to enable discussion on disease prevention, spread, transmissibility, severity and treatment. Human disease preparedness and response is WHO’s role, so diseases are officially named by WHO in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD).

ICTV announced “severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)” as the name of the new virus on 11 February 2020. This name was chosen because the virus is genetically related to the coronavirus responsible for the SARS outbreak of 2003. While related, the two viruses are different.

WHO announced “COVID-19” as the name of this new disease on 11 February 2020, following guidelines previously developed with the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO).

WHO Director-General’s remarks at the media on 11 February 2020
WHO Situation Report on 11 February 2020
WHO and ICTV were in communication about the naming of both the virus and the disease.

What name does WHO use for the virus?
From a risk communications perspective, using the name SARS can have unintended consequences in terms of creating unnecessary fear for some populations, especially in Asia which was worst affected by the SARS outbreak in 2003.

For that reason and others, WHO has begun referring to the virus as “the virus responsible for COVID-19” or “the COVID-19 virus” when communicating with the public. Neither of these designations are intended as replacements for the official name of the virus as agreed by the ICTV.

Material published before the virus was officially named will not be updated unless necessary in order to avoid confusion.

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) technical guidance: Patient management

Considerations for quarantine of individuals in the context of containment for coronavirus disease (COVID-19)

The purpose of this document is to offer guidance to Member States on quarantine measures for individuals in the context of COVID-19. It is intended for those responsible for establishing local or national policy for quarantine of individuals, and adherence to infection prevention and control measures.

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Clinical management of severe acute respiratory infection when novel coronavirus (nCoV) infection is suspected

This document is intended for clinicians taking care of hospitalised adult and paediatric patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) when a nCoV infection is suspected. It is not meant to replace clinical judgment or specialist consultation but rather to strengthen clinical management of these patients and provide to up-to-date guidance. Best practices for SARI including IPC and optimized supportive care for severely ill patients are essential.

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Home care for patients with suspected novel coronavirus (nCoV) infection presenting with mild symptoms and management of contacts

WHO has developed this rapid advice note to meet the need for recommendations on the safe home care for patients with suspected novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) infection presenting with mild symptoms and public health measures
related to management of asymptomatic contacts.

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Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) technical guidance: Risk communication and community engagement
Mental Health Considerations during COVID-19 Outbreak

These mental health considerations were developed by the Mental Health Department as support for mental and psychological well-being during COVID-19 outbreak.

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Risk communication and community engagement (RCCE) readiness and response to the 2019 novel coronavirus (‎‎2019-nCoV)‎‎
This document provides WHO checklists for risk communication and community engagement (RCCE) readiness and initial response for novel coronaviruses (nCoV) recently identified in Wuhan, China. The objective of this document is to provide actionable guidance for countries to implement effective RCCE strategies which will help protect the public’s health in the early response to nCoV. This document includes recommended RCCE goals and actions for countries preparing for nCoV cases and for countries that have confirmed nCoV cases.

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The COVID-19 risk communication package for healthcare facilities
In response to the COVID-19 outbreak this risk communication package for healthcare facilities provides healthcare workers (HCWs) and healthcare facility management with the information, procedures, and tools required to safely and effectively work. The package contains a series of simplified messages and reminders based on WHO’s more in-depth technical guidance on infection prevention and control in healthcare facilities in the context of COVID-19: “Infection prevention and control during health care when novel coronavirus (nCoV) infection is suspected” (25 January 2020). HCWs play a critical role in outbreak response and are the backbone of a country’s defenses to limit or contain the spread of disease. They face higher risks of potential COVID-19 infection in their efforts to protect the greater community and are exposed to hazards such as psychological distress, fatigue and stigma. WHO recognizes this essential work and the responsibility and importance of protecting the healthcare facility workforce.

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Getting your workplace ready for COVID-19
WHO and public health authorities around the world are taking action to contain the COVID-19 outbreak. However, long term success cannot be taken for granted. All sections of our society – including businesses and employers – must play a role if we are to stop the spread of this disease.

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A guide to preventing and addressing social stigma associated with COVID-19
Social stigma in the context of health is the negative association between a person or group of people who share certain characteristics and a specific disease. In an outbreak, this may mean people are labelled, stereotyped, discriminated against, treated separately, and/or experience loss of status because of a perceived link with a disease.

The current COVID-19 outbreak has provoked social stigma and discriminatory behaviours against people of certain ethnic backgrounds as well as anyone perceived to have been in contact with the virus.

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source from https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/technical-guidance/risk-communication-and-community-engagement

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